Tag: ingels name means the son of ingle or eagle

Ingels name means the son of Ingle or Eagle

Ingels name means the son of Ingle or Eagle

Ingels The surname of INGELS was a baptismal name ‘the son of Ingle or Engle’. The earliest of the name on record appears to be INGOLD (without surname) who was listed as a tenant in the Domesday Book of 1086. Most of the European surnames were formed in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. The process had started somewhat earlier and had continued in some places into the 19th century, but the norm is that in the tenth and eleventh centuries people did not have surnames, whereas by the fifteenth century most of the population had acquired a second name. Other records of the name mention Emma Ingel, 1273, County Huntingdonshire. Willelmus Ingill of Yorkshire, was listed in the Yorkshire Poll Tax of 1379. Baptised. Margaret, daughter of William Ingoll, St. Peter, Cornhill, London in the year 1656. Originally the coat of arms identified the wearer, either in battle or in tournaments. Completely covered in body and facial armour the knight could be spotted and known by the insignia painted on his shield, and embroidered on his surcoat, the draped garment which enveloped him.Between the 11th and 15th centuries it became customary for surnames to be assumed in Europe, but were not commonplace in England or Scotland before the Norman Conquest of 1066. They are to be found in the Domesday Book of 1086. Those of gentler blood assumed surnames at this time, but it was not until the reign of Edward II (1307-1327) that second names became general practice for all people. The rise of surnames, according to the accepted theory, was due to the Norman Conquest of 1066 when Old English personal-names were rapidly superseded by the new christian names introduced by the Normans. Of these, only a few were really popular and in the 12th century this scarcity of christian names led to the increasing use of surnames to distinguish the numerous individuals of the same name. Some Normans had hereditary surnames before they came to England, but there is evidence that surnames would have developed in England even had there been no Norman Conquest. The development of the feudal system made it essential that the king should know exactly what service each person owed. Payments to and by the exchequer required that debtors and creditors should be particularized, and it became official that each individual acquired exact identification. ARMS – Argent two chevronels sable on a chief of the second a lion passant of the first CREST – A hand erect issuing out of a cloud holding a sword blade waved proper No motto recorded Created by Firstnamestore.com

 

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